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Bicycles & VTA

VTA’s Bicycle Program works to make bicycling a safer, more practical option for Santa Clara County residents and visitors. The Bicycle Program supports bicycling through countywide planning, funding, project development, and through development of design guidelines and best practices. The Bicycle Program also supports integrating bicycling with transit.

VTA’s Bicycle and Pedestrian Program is responsible for many different components ranging in scale from developing long-range planning documents, such as the Santa Clara Countywide Bicycle Plan and Pedestrian Access to Transit Plan, to prioritizing and awarding funds for the Bicycle Expenditure Program, to assisting with design review of projects. Program staff also supports the VTA/County Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee. The Bicycle and Pedestrian Program serves many customers, including VTA staff, VTA Board members, Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee members, Member Agency and Caltrans staff, and the public.

 


Mary Avenue Bridge over I-280

Bikes on Transit

Picture of a person hanging a bike in a light rail vehicle.

Bikes on Buses and Light Rail

VTA has equipped all buses with exterior bike racks that can accommodate up to two bicycles. The buses on the Highway 17 Express and the Dumbarton Express are also equipped with bike racks. The Highway 17 Express can accommodate up to three bicycles.  When the racks are filled, up to two bicycles will be allowed inside the bus subject to the driver's discretion when passenger loads are light.




 


This video demonstrates how to use bike racks on VTA buses, including valuable safety tips all bike using passengers should follow.


VTA Bike Rules & Regulations

Bicycle rules and regulations onboard VTA buses and light rail vehicles and within areas of transit facilities.

General

No additional fare is required, but bicyclists shall have paid appropriate fare.

Only human powered and sealed dry or gel cell electric assisted bicycles are allowed.

Bicyclists shall not block aisles, stepwells or doors of any bus or light rail vehicle.

Bicyclists shall avoid getting chain and sprocket grease on the bus, light rail vehicle and other passengers. No muddy bicycles shall be permitted onboard at any time.

Other passengers shall be allowed to enter and exit first before a bicyclist boards or deboards the bus or light rail vehicle with their bicycle.

Bicyclists shall always walk bicycles on passenger platforms at transit centers and on light rail station platforms.

Bicyclists shall not chain bicycles to poles, light standards, pillars, etc. at transit centers or on light rail station platforms.

All bicycles not taken on buses and light rail vehicles shall be parked off transit center and light rail platforms in bicycle racks or lockers.

Buses

Bicyclists are responsible for securing their bicycles in the exterior bike rack.

Bicycles may be permitted onboard buses at the driver's discresion when:
a) The bus does not have a fully operational bicycle rack, or ;
b) The exterior rack is filled.

A maximum of two bicycles shall be permitted inside the bus if the passenger load permits the safe boarding, deboarding and stowing of the bicycle.

Bicyclists shall be responsible for attending their bicycles when bringing them inside the bus.

Light Rail Vehicles

The maximum number of bicycles allowed inside a light rail vehicle is six. Up to four bicycles can be accommodated in the racks provided, with two additional bicycles allowed to stand on the floor in the center section (turntable area) of the vehicle.

All bicycles must be boarded through the center doors of each car, and are restricted to the designated area in the center section of the vehicle.

Bicyclists are responsible for securing their bicycles in the racks provided. Bicycles not secured in the racks must be attended by the cyclist.
 

Bikes on Caltrain

Caltrain permits bikes on board. Please see Caltrain Bicycle FAQ’s for the most updated information.

Bike Parking

Bike commuters have access to secure bike parking systemwide. Bike racks and bike lockers have been installed in nearly all VTA Park & Ride lots and Transit Centers and bike parking demand is continuously monitored. VTA is currently implementing an e-locker system to manage parking at high demand sites. For bike parking needs outside the transit system, VTA’s Bike Rack Giveaway Program donated racks to local agencies and businesses to install throughout the County.

 

Bike Lockers

VTA provides 500 bike lockers at light rail and Caltrain stations, Park & Ride lots and transit centers for the use of transit riders. There is no charge for a bike locker rental. However, a $25 refundable security deposit is required.

At sites where bike parking demand exceeds parking supply, VTA is transitioning from the current one-locker-per-person system to a Smart Card key system whereby a pool of lockers will be available on a first-come first-serve basis to Smart Card owners. Since February 2009, VTA has retrofitted 111 mechanical lockers into eLockers at 12 bike locker locations.

The schedule for the remaining 400 lockers will depend on funding availability.

Existing locker renters can exchange their locker key for a Smart Card. Call (408) 321-7520 or email bikelockers@vta.org for information on how to obtain a Smart Card. Smart Cards can be purchased online at www.bikelink.org.

If you are interested and would like to apply for a bike locker at the remaining sites, please call (408) 321-7520 or e-mail your request to bikelockers@vta.org. Please include your name, address, phone and fax numbers, as well as the desired locker location. VTA will send you an application.

For a list of VTA bike locker locations, click here: https://www.bikelink.org/map

 

Bicycle Dos and Don'ts

DOs
Obey traffic signs and signals Obey traffic signs and signals
Bicyclists must drive like motorists if they are to be taken seriously. Bicyclists are required to come to a complete stop at stop signs and red signal lights.
  Ride with both hands, ready to brake Ride with both hands, ready to brake
You may need to stop suddenly at unexpected times. In rain, allow three times the normal braking distance.
 
Use hand signals Use hand signals
Hand signals tell motorists what you intend to do. Signal as a matter of law, courtesy, and self-protection.
  Ride to see and be seen Ride to see and be seen
Use a strong headlight and rear reflector or taillight at night or when visibility is poor. Wear light-colored clothes with reflective tape for extra protection. Reflective leg bands are also effective.
 
Ride in the middle of the lane in slow traffic Ride in the middle of the lane in slow traffic
Don't ride the line. Get in the middle of the lanes at busy intersections and whenever you are moving at the same speed as traffic.
  You may leave a bike lane You may leave a bike lane
When a road hazard or other obstruction exists in a bike lane, or you anticipate a motorist migh turn across your path, you may temporarily merge with caution into the adjacent motor vehicle lane for safety.
 
Choose the best way to turn left There are three ways to make a left turn.
1.  Like a vehicle: Signal, look back for oncoming traffic, then move into the left turn lane. Turn left when it is clear.
2.  Like a bicycle: Ride to the far side of the intersection, stop, turn, and then ride across the street when the light turns green.
3.  Like a pedestrian: You can always get off your bike and walk across one or both crosswalks. Yield to pedestrians.
  Avoid road hazards Avoid road hazards Watch out for parallel-slat sewer grates, slippery manhole covers, oily pavement, detour signage, sand, gravel and debris. Cross railroad tracks carefully at right angles. For better control as you move across bumps and other hazards, stand up off the seat.
 
Follow lane markings Follow lane markings
Do not turn left from the right lane. Do not go straight in a lane marked right-turn only.
  Watch for cars pulling out Watch for cars pulling out
Make eye contact with drivers. Assume they don't see you until you are sure they do. When the sun is in their eyes, drivers may not see you.
 
Keep clear of the door zone Keep clear of the door zone
Try to ride a door's width away from parked cars. If you have to ride in the door zone, ride very slowly. You have the right to ride in the middle of a motor vehicle lane if it is too narrow to share with a car. Watch for cars pulling out.
  Scan the road around you Scan the road around you
Keep your eyes roving constantly for cars, people, sand and gravel, grates, etc. Learn to look back over your shoulder without losing your balance or swerving.
 
Respects pedestrians rights Respect pedestrians' rights
Pedestrians on sidewalks and in crosswalks have the right of way. When entering or exiting driveways, bicyclists must yield to pedestrians on the sidewalk. Never ride on the sidewalk unless it is specifically permitted. If permitted to ride on the sidewalk, ride slowly. Be especially aware of small children, the elderly, people with pets, people with disabilities and their service animals.
     
 
DON'TS
Never ride against traffic Never ride against traffic
Motorists are not looking for bicyclists riding against traffic on the wrong side of the road.
  Don't weave between parked cars Don't weave between parked cars
Motorists may not see you when you try to move into traffic. Use extra caution on streets that allow use of the parking shoulder as a motor vehicle lane during peak hours.
 
Don't pass on the right Don't pass on the right
Motorists may not look for nor see a bicycle passing on the right.
  In front, or far behind, not beside! In front, or far behind, not beside!
To ensure drivers of large vehicles (buses, trucks and motor homes) can see you, stay out of their blind spots. Never pass on the right side. Ride far enough behind for the driver to see you, and at least four feet from the sides to avoid falling under a large vehicle.

Rules of the Road

A few common rules of the road for bicycles include: 

1. All bicyclists under the age of 18 are required by law to wear a helmet.
2. All bicyclists riding at night must have a white front light, a rear red reflector, and white or yellow reflectors on the pedals or ankles.
3. Bicycles have the same rights and responsibilities on the road as vehicles.
4. Bicycles must travel in the same direction as vehicles on the road, and not ride on the sidewalk.
5. California law requires drivers to leave a minimum of 3 feet of space when passing a bicycle.

Please refer to the California Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) and their website for the complete vehicle code, and the driver handbook. These materials also discuss rules for motorists sharing the road with bicycles, and are available in multiple languages.

Preventing Bicycle Theft

Locking your bike to a bicycle rack can prevent most bicycle thefts:

Securing your bicycle using a cable lock or chain:

  1. Use a cable or chain at least 3/8” in diameter.
  2. Use a key lock with a 3/8” hardened shackle with heel and toe locking
  3. Loop the cable or chain through each of the wheels, the bicycle frame and the rack.
  4. Pull up all slack in the cable or chain and make sure the lock is as high off the ground as possible.

Securing your bicycle using a “U”-Type Lock

  1. On bikes with quick-release wheels – release the front wheel and include it with the rear wheel and the bicycle frame when securing it to the bike rack.
  2. On bikes without quick-release wheels – position the lock through both the front wheel and the bicycle frame when securing it to the bicycle rack.

Other tips:

  1. Park your bicycle in a location where it is visible to as many people as possible.
  2. Do not secure it to trees, buildings, signposts, handrailings, etc.
  3. Record the make, model and serial number of your bicycle and keep it in a safe place.
  4. Engrave a personal identification number of your choice somewhere on the frame. Remember the number and its locations.  This will help with identification if it is recovered.

photo of bike share bicycle

What is Bike Share?

Bike share systems provide a network of iconic public bicycles from self-service bike share stations - or pods - located around town. Bike sharing centers on short trips to multiple destinations. Similar to car-sharing, members can check out a bicycle, ride to their destination and return the bicycle to any bike share station in the system. Bike share uses unique, commuter-style bicycles designed for urban use and employs features such as smart cards, solar powered stations, and wireless internet.

Bay Area Bike Share launched on August 29, 2013 in five cities along the Caltrain commute corridor—San Jose, Mountain View (since discontinued), Palo Alto, Redwood City and San Francisco.  The system operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week with 700 bicycles available systemwide. Bike Share is expanding, with new stations and more bikes being added over time.

Bay Area Bike Share is a multi-agency partnership between VTA, Bay Area Air Quality Management District (Air District), Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC), County of San Mateo, Redwood City, Caltrain, San Mateo County Transit (SamTrans), and City and County of San Francisco.

The pilot program was funded through a combination of local, regional and federal grants including MTC's Climate Initiatives Program and Air District's Transportation Fund for Clean Air (TFCA) Program. After the initial pilot period, user fees and sponsorships are funding the on-going operations and maintenance of the system.

Bike Share in Santa Clara County

There are stations operating in San Jose and Palo Alto. Bike share stations are located at key Caltrain stations and activity centers such as downtowns, universities, shopping centers, city halls and major employment centers within a mile or two of the Caltrain stations.

Map of existing and planned station locations

How can I participate?

Know of a good location for a future bike share station? Post your suggestion on the bike share crowdsource map or email your suggestion to bikeshare@vta.org.

Help us grow Bay Area Bike Share! If you're a business, school, or homeowners association interested in sponsoring a station, please contact bikeshare@vta.org. for more information.

email: Bikes@vta.org
or send via regular mail to:
3331 N. First Street
San Jose, CA, 95134-1906
Attn: CMA Planning, Building B-2

 

VTA Bike Locker info
(408) 321-7520 or bikelockers@vta.org

Caltrain Bike Locker info
(650) 508-6350

To learn how to include bus and light rail as part of your bicycle commute:

VTA’s Trip Planner Powered by Google Transit
511 Trip Planner 
To plan your trip with a live VTA customer service representative, please call VTA Customer Service at (408) 321-2300 during regular business hours.

Phone Numbers:
VTA Telephone Information (408) 321-2300
TTY/TDD (408) 321-2330
650 & So. Santa Clara County Toll Areas (800) 894-9908

Address:
3331 N. First Street
San Jose, CA, 95134-1906

Office Hours:
Monday - Friday, 6:00 am to 7:00 pm
Saturday: 7:30 am - 4:00 pm
Closed Sunday, Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Years Day

  • Bicycle Program
  • VTA’s Bicycle Program works to make bicycling a safer, more practical option for Santa Clara County residents and visitors. The Bicycle Program supports bicycling through countywide planning, funding, project development, and through development of design guidelines and best practices. The Bicycle Program also supports integrating bicycling with transit.

    VTA’s Bicycle and Pedestrian Program is responsible for many different components ranging in scale from developing long-range planning documents, such as the Santa Clara Countywide Bicycle Plan and Pedestrian Access to Transit Plan, to prioritizing and awarding funds for the Bicycle Expenditure Program, to assisting with design review of projects. Program staff also supports the VTA/County Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee. The Bicycle and Pedestrian Program serves many customers, including VTA staff, VTA Board members, Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee members, Member Agency and Caltrans staff, and the public.

     


    Mary Avenue Bridge over I-280

  • Bikes on Transit
  • Bikes on Transit

    Picture of a person hanging a bike in a light rail vehicle.

    Bikes on Buses and Light Rail

    VTA has equipped all buses with exterior bike racks that can accommodate up to two bicycles. The buses on the Highway 17 Express and the Dumbarton Express are also equipped with bike racks. The Highway 17 Express can accommodate up to three bicycles.  When the racks are filled, up to two bicycles will be allowed inside the bus subject to the driver's discretion when passenger loads are light.




     


    This video demonstrates how to use bike racks on VTA buses, including valuable safety tips all bike using passengers should follow.


    VTA Bike Rules & Regulations

    Bicycle rules and regulations onboard VTA buses and light rail vehicles and within areas of transit facilities.

    General

    No additional fare is required, but bicyclists shall have paid appropriate fare.

    Only human powered and sealed dry or gel cell electric assisted bicycles are allowed.

    Bicyclists shall not block aisles, stepwells or doors of any bus or light rail vehicle.

    Bicyclists shall avoid getting chain and sprocket grease on the bus, light rail vehicle and other passengers. No muddy bicycles shall be permitted onboard at any time.

    Other passengers shall be allowed to enter and exit first before a bicyclist boards or deboards the bus or light rail vehicle with their bicycle.

    Bicyclists shall always walk bicycles on passenger platforms at transit centers and on light rail station platforms.

    Bicyclists shall not chain bicycles to poles, light standards, pillars, etc. at transit centers or on light rail station platforms.

    All bicycles not taken on buses and light rail vehicles shall be parked off transit center and light rail platforms in bicycle racks or lockers.

    Buses

    Bicyclists are responsible for securing their bicycles in the exterior bike rack.

    Bicycles may be permitted onboard buses at the driver's discresion when:
    a) The bus does not have a fully operational bicycle rack, or ;
    b) The exterior rack is filled.

    A maximum of two bicycles shall be permitted inside the bus if the passenger load permits the safe boarding, deboarding and stowing of the bicycle.

    Bicyclists shall be responsible for attending their bicycles when bringing them inside the bus.

    Light Rail Vehicles

    The maximum number of bicycles allowed inside a light rail vehicle is six. Up to four bicycles can be accommodated in the racks provided, with two additional bicycles allowed to stand on the floor in the center section (turntable area) of the vehicle.

    All bicycles must be boarded through the center doors of each car, and are restricted to the designated area in the center section of the vehicle.

    Bicyclists are responsible for securing their bicycles in the racks provided. Bicycles not secured in the racks must be attended by the cyclist.
     

    Bikes on Caltrain

    Caltrain permits bikes on board. Please see Caltrain Bicycle FAQ’s for the most updated information.

  • Bikeways Maps
  • System Map Section A Bikeways Map System Map Section B Bikeways Map System Map Section C Bikeways Map
    System Map Section D Bikeways Map System Map Section E Bikeways Map System Map Section F Bikeways Map
     
    Click here to view entire bikeways map!
    Click here to view the informational side of the map
  • Bike Parking
  • Bike Parking

    Bike commuters have access to secure bike parking systemwide. Bike racks and bike lockers have been installed in nearly all VTA Park & Ride lots and Transit Centers and bike parking demand is continuously monitored. VTA is currently implementing an e-locker system to manage parking at high demand sites. For bike parking needs outside the transit system, VTA’s Bike Rack Giveaway Program donated racks to local agencies and businesses to install throughout the County.

     

    Bike Lockers

    VTA provides 500 bike lockers at light rail and Caltrain stations, Park & Ride lots and transit centers for the use of transit riders. There is no charge for a bike locker rental. However, a $25 refundable security deposit is required.

    At sites where bike parking demand exceeds parking supply, VTA is transitioning from the current one-locker-per-person system to a Smart Card key system whereby a pool of lockers will be available on a first-come first-serve basis to Smart Card owners. Since February 2009, VTA has retrofitted 111 mechanical lockers into eLockers at 12 bike locker locations.

    The schedule for the remaining 400 lockers will depend on funding availability.

    Existing locker renters can exchange their locker key for a Smart Card. Call (408) 321-7520 or email bikelockers@vta.org for information on how to obtain a Smart Card. Smart Cards can be purchased online at www.bikelink.org.

    If you are interested and would like to apply for a bike locker at the remaining sites, please call (408) 321-7520 or e-mail your request to bikelockers@vta.org. Please include your name, address, phone and fax numbers, as well as the desired locker location. VTA will send you an application.

    For a list of VTA bike locker locations, click here: https://www.bikelink.org/map

     

  • Laws & Safety Tips
  • Bicycle Dos and Don'ts

    DOs
    Obey traffic signs and signals Obey traffic signs and signals
    Bicyclists must drive like motorists if they are to be taken seriously. Bicyclists are required to come to a complete stop at stop signs and red signal lights.
      Ride with both hands, ready to brake Ride with both hands, ready to brake
    You may need to stop suddenly at unexpected times. In rain, allow three times the normal braking distance.
     
    Use hand signals Use hand signals
    Hand signals tell motorists what you intend to do. Signal as a matter of law, courtesy, and self-protection.
      Ride to see and be seen Ride to see and be seen
    Use a strong headlight and rear reflector or taillight at night or when visibility is poor. Wear light-colored clothes with reflective tape for extra protection. Reflective leg bands are also effective.
     
    Ride in the middle of the lane in slow traffic Ride in the middle of the lane in slow traffic
    Don't ride the line. Get in the middle of the lanes at busy intersections and whenever you are moving at the same speed as traffic.
      You may leave a bike lane You may leave a bike lane
    When a road hazard or other obstruction exists in a bike lane, or you anticipate a motorist migh turn across your path, you may temporarily merge with caution into the adjacent motor vehicle lane for safety.
     
    Choose the best way to turn left There are three ways to make a left turn.
    1.  Like a vehicle: Signal, look back for oncoming traffic, then move into the left turn lane. Turn left when it is clear.
    2.  Like a bicycle: Ride to the far side of the intersection, stop, turn, and then ride across the street when the light turns green.
    3.  Like a pedestrian: You can always get off your bike and walk across one or both crosswalks. Yield to pedestrians.
      Avoid road hazards Avoid road hazards Watch out for parallel-slat sewer grates, slippery manhole covers, oily pavement, detour signage, sand, gravel and debris. Cross railroad tracks carefully at right angles. For better control as you move across bumps and other hazards, stand up off the seat.
     
    Follow lane markings Follow lane markings
    Do not turn left from the right lane. Do not go straight in a lane marked right-turn only.
      Watch for cars pulling out Watch for cars pulling out
    Make eye contact with drivers. Assume they don't see you until you are sure they do. When the sun is in their eyes, drivers may not see you.
     
    Keep clear of the door zone Keep clear of the door zone
    Try to ride a door's width away from parked cars. If you have to ride in the door zone, ride very slowly. You have the right to ride in the middle of a motor vehicle lane if it is too narrow to share with a car. Watch for cars pulling out.
      Scan the road around you Scan the road around you
    Keep your eyes roving constantly for cars, people, sand and gravel, grates, etc. Learn to look back over your shoulder without losing your balance or swerving.
     
    Respects pedestrians rights Respect pedestrians' rights
    Pedestrians on sidewalks and in crosswalks have the right of way. When entering or exiting driveways, bicyclists must yield to pedestrians on the sidewalk. Never ride on the sidewalk unless it is specifically permitted. If permitted to ride on the sidewalk, ride slowly. Be especially aware of small children, the elderly, people with pets, people with disabilities and their service animals.
         
     
    DON'TS
    Never ride against traffic Never ride against traffic
    Motorists are not looking for bicyclists riding against traffic on the wrong side of the road.
      Don't weave between parked cars Don't weave between parked cars
    Motorists may not see you when you try to move into traffic. Use extra caution on streets that allow use of the parking shoulder as a motor vehicle lane during peak hours.
     
    Don't pass on the right Don't pass on the right
    Motorists may not look for nor see a bicycle passing on the right.
      In front, or far behind, not beside! In front, or far behind, not beside!
    To ensure drivers of large vehicles (buses, trucks and motor homes) can see you, stay out of their blind spots. Never pass on the right side. Ride far enough behind for the driver to see you, and at least four feet from the sides to avoid falling under a large vehicle.

    Rules of the Road

    A few common rules of the road for bicycles include: 

    1. All bicyclists under the age of 18 are required by law to wear a helmet.
    2. All bicyclists riding at night must have a white front light, a rear red reflector, and white or yellow reflectors on the pedals or ankles.
    3. Bicycles have the same rights and responsibilities on the road as vehicles.
    4. Bicycles must travel in the same direction as vehicles on the road, and not ride on the sidewalk.
    5. California law requires drivers to leave a minimum of 3 feet of space when passing a bicycle.

    Please refer to the California Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) and their website for the complete vehicle code, and the driver handbook. These materials also discuss rules for motorists sharing the road with bicycles, and are available in multiple languages.

    Preventing Bicycle Theft

    Locking your bike to a bicycle rack can prevent most bicycle thefts:

    Securing your bicycle using a cable lock or chain:

    1. Use a cable or chain at least 3/8” in diameter.
    2. Use a key lock with a 3/8” hardened shackle with heel and toe locking
    3. Loop the cable or chain through each of the wheels, the bicycle frame and the rack.
    4. Pull up all slack in the cable or chain and make sure the lock is as high off the ground as possible.

    Securing your bicycle using a “U”-Type Lock

    1. On bikes with quick-release wheels – release the front wheel and include it with the rear wheel and the bicycle frame when securing it to the bike rack.
    2. On bikes without quick-release wheels – position the lock through both the front wheel and the bicycle frame when securing it to the bicycle rack.

    Other tips:

    1. Park your bicycle in a location where it is visible to as many people as possible.
    2. Do not secure it to trees, buildings, signposts, handrailings, etc.
    3. Record the make, model and serial number of your bicycle and keep it in a safe place.
    4. Engrave a personal identification number of your choice somewhere on the frame. Remember the number and its locations.  This will help with identification if it is recovered.
  • Bike Share
  • photo of bike share bicycle

    What is Bike Share?

    Bike share systems provide a network of iconic public bicycles from self-service bike share stations - or pods - located around town. Bike sharing centers on short trips to multiple destinations. Similar to car-sharing, members can check out a bicycle, ride to their destination and return the bicycle to any bike share station in the system. Bike share uses unique, commuter-style bicycles designed for urban use and employs features such as smart cards, solar powered stations, and wireless internet.

    Bay Area Bike Share launched on August 29, 2013 in five cities along the Caltrain commute corridor—San Jose, Mountain View (since discontinued), Palo Alto, Redwood City and San Francisco.  The system operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week with 700 bicycles available systemwide. Bike Share is expanding, with new stations and more bikes being added over time.

    Bay Area Bike Share is a multi-agency partnership between VTA, Bay Area Air Quality Management District (Air District), Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC), County of San Mateo, Redwood City, Caltrain, San Mateo County Transit (SamTrans), and City and County of San Francisco.

    The pilot program was funded through a combination of local, regional and federal grants including MTC's Climate Initiatives Program and Air District's Transportation Fund for Clean Air (TFCA) Program. After the initial pilot period, user fees and sponsorships are funding the on-going operations and maintenance of the system.

    Bike Share in Santa Clara County

    There are stations operating in San Jose and Palo Alto. Bike share stations are located at key Caltrain stations and activity centers such as downtowns, universities, shopping centers, city halls and major employment centers within a mile or two of the Caltrain stations.

    Map of existing and planned station locations

    How can I participate?

    Know of a good location for a future bike share station? Post your suggestion on the bike share crowdsource map or email your suggestion to bikeshare@vta.org.

    Help us grow Bay Area Bike Share! If you're a business, school, or homeowners association interested in sponsoring a station, please contact bikeshare@vta.org. for more information.

  • Contact Us
  • email: Bikes@vta.org
    or send via regular mail to:
    3331 N. First Street
    San Jose, CA, 95134-1906
    Attn: CMA Planning, Building B-2

     

    VTA Bike Locker info
    (408) 321-7520 or bikelockers@vta.org

    Caltrain Bike Locker info
    (650) 508-6350

    To learn how to include bus and light rail as part of your bicycle commute:

    VTA’s Trip Planner Powered by Google Transit
    511 Trip Planner 
    To plan your trip with a live VTA customer service representative, please call VTA Customer Service at (408) 321-2300 during regular business hours.

    Phone Numbers:
    VTA Telephone Information (408) 321-2300
    TTY/TDD (408) 321-2330
    650 & So. Santa Clara County Toll Areas (800) 894-9908

    Address:
    3331 N. First Street
    San Jose, CA, 95134-1906

    Office Hours:
    Monday - Friday, 6:00 am to 7:00 pm
    Saturday: 7:30 am - 4:00 pm
    Closed Sunday, Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Years Day

Notices & Service Alerts

Last update: 05/26/2017

VTA Memorial Day Service: will operate on a Sunday schedule Monday 5/29

5/27-5/29: Light Rail Service Notice: Bus Bridge from Baypointe to Civic Center Mountain View to Alum Rock on different schedule

Reroute of Lines 22, 63, 64, 68, 81, 181, 522 & MST 55: due to Color Run 5/27

Montague Light Rail Station Two-Month Closure Effective: May 22, 2017:

Trip Planner